General Info about Golf Wedges

Golf Wedges have come a long way in recent years. New lofts and clubhead shapes have prompted many players to carry as many as four wedges, for every conceivable situation around the green. If you’re just carrying the old reliable pitching wedge, you’re missing out on some simple ways to lower your scores. After all, more than 70% of your game is played from 100 yards or closer. More below…


Golf Clubs: Pinemeadow Wedge

Pinemeadow Wedge

A dark tumble finished paired with a big sweet spot have made this wedge so successful. The expanded face area makes this wedge the easiest to play out of the most difficult lies allowing the golfer to get under the ball but still have enough club to generate control and ball flight. This wedge is also available in an assortment of lofts (52, 56, 60, 64 and 68) for both RH and LH players.
Price starts from $24.95 and includes Custom Fitting, as well as full Money back Guarantee and a full year of Warranty.
Click here to get the Pinemeadow Wedge custom fitted for you.


Golf Clubs: PGX Wedge

PGX Wedge

The PGX wedge is the perfect addition to complete your PGX set. Available in 3 lofts, it gives you options to suit your needs. All the wedges features a wide sole at the bottom of the club head which narrows towards the toe to provide a more forgiving hitting surface. Add a PGX Wedge to your set now and start improving your game today!
Click here to get the PGX Wedge custom fitted for you.


Golf Clubs: Pinemeadow Golf Pre Bronze Wedge

Pre Bronze Wedge

The newest member to the PRE family. The wedge features a wide sole at the bottom of the club head which narrows towards the toe to provide a more forgiving hitting surface. Combine this proven shape and bounce design to provide accurate play from any lie. Features a bronze finish for a sleek look.
Click here to get the Pre Bronze Wedge custom fitted for you.

How Golf Wedges Work

All wedges are characterized by high lofts (typically 45-60 degrees) to increase trajectory, and significant sole weighting to help you penetrate sand or grass. Most are also heavier overall. But that’s where the similarities end. Each wedge type has its own characteristics, making it suited to a particular distance or lie.

One important characteristic is the bounce angle. As the name implies, this feature enables the clubhead to “bounce” out of the sand or rough without digging in. If you look at the sole of a sand wedge, for instance, you’ll notice that the trailing edge hangs below the leading edge. Bounce is the angle formed by the leading edge and the ground. This tiny angle (maximum 16 degrees) doesn’t sound like much, but it’s what makes it worthwhile for you to carry a good sand wedge in your bag. Without bounce, you may just stay in that bunker forever. And in general, less experienced players should use a club with more bounce in soft or fluffy lies. Trust me.

As with putters, wedges are the focus of a lot of experimentation in materials and face inserts. Clubheads are often made of softer materials, such as copper or beryllium alloy, to increase feel and touch around the green. Some are intended to rust over time, giving a unique appearance. Manufacturers have also devised unique ways to impart precise spin on the ball and help it hold the green upon landing. The most basic treatment is scoring or sandblasting of the face. U-shaped grooves, which are square at the bottom, are also used. Still another method is to use a different material altogether in the face, such as a super-hard diamond compound.

One major development has been the introduction of the “gap” or “dual” wedge. As manufacturers decreased the loft of the typical pitching wedge to increase its distance (a little sleight of hand), they created a “gap” between it and the next longest club, the sand wedge (see graphic). Thus, in order of distance, the progression is as follows: pitching wedge, gap wedge, sand wedge, and lob wedge. They are described here in order.

General Info about Golf Wedges

Pitching Wedge

This club has typically 45-49 degrees of loft and is used for longer approach shots (about 110 yards for men, 90 yards for women). Because it’s most often hit from the grass, it has minimal bounce (2-5 degrees). In fact, a lot of bounce would be undesirable in this club, because it would make it more difficult to get the leading edge under the ball, causing you to skull it.

Gap Wedge

This club has typically 49-54 degrees of loft and is used for shots of about 100 yards for men, or about 95 yards for women. Bounce is typically 5-12 degrees. But don’t pick a gap wedge at random. Choose a loft that divides the “gap” evenly between your pitching and sand wedges. For instance, if you have a 48-degree PW and a 56-degree SW, buy a gap wedge with 52 degrees. Get it? This club is also known as a “dual” or “attack” wedge.

Sand Wedge

This club has typically 54-57 degrees of loft and is used for shots of about 90 yards maximum for men, or about 80 yards for women. It also has the most unique clubhead of the bunch, with lots of bounce (10-16 degrees) and another feature called heel-toe camber. This is what gives the sand wedge an oval shape on the bottom of the face. Finally, sand wedges have more sole width (the distance between the leading and trailing edge). All these features are designed to reduce the risk of digging in.

Lob Wedge

This club has 57 or more degrees of loft and is used for shots of about 65 yards maximum for men, or 60 yards for women. These clubs, also called “finesse” wedges, are for “touch” shots around the green that need to get into the air quickly and land softly. Bounce is minimal (0-10 degrees), because in these situations there is generally very little room under the ball, and a tiny error can make the club bounce off the ground and cause a skulled shot. It has less sole width and a sharp leading edge. One reason many players like this club is because it allows a full, unimpeded swing to cover a short distance, rather than making you rely on an abbreviated swing. The ball flies short and high.

General Info about Golf Wedges

Golf Wedges Definitions

Bounce angle

The angle formed by the leading edge of the clubhead and the ground. Reduces “dig” in the sand and other tough lies.

Dig

The tendency for the leading edge of the clubhead to stop short in the rough, rather than pass cleanly under the ball.

Gap wedge

A wedge with a loft and trajectory designed to fit between the pitching wedge (hits longer) and the sand wedge (hits shorter). Also known as a “dual” or “attack” wedge.

Heel-toe camber

The curved portion of the sole, between the leading and trailing edges. This feature reduces “dig.”

Insert

A clubface material (such as a diamond compound) designed to increase grip and promote spin.

Leading edge

The frontmost edge of the clubhead. A sharp leading edge is best for a smooth lie.

Lob wedge

The shortest-hitting wedge, with the most loft, for “touch” shots around the green.

Loft angle

The angle at which the clubface looks upward.

Pitching wedge

The longest wedge, for approach shots.

Sand wedge

A wedge with pronounced bounce and heel-toe camber that’s specifically designed to get you out of the bunker and reduce “dig.”

Scoring

Lines in the clubface designed to increase grip and promote spin.

Sole

The bottom portion of the clubhead that’s in contact with the ground.

Sole width

The distance between the leading and trailing edges. Greatest on the sand wedge, to help splash through sand, and least pronounced on the lob wedge, to ensure that you get under the ball on a flat lie.

Trailing edge

The rearmost edge of the clubhead.